Now Playing
105.5 WDUV
Last Song Played
Continuous Lite Favorites

Results 1 - 20 of 48 next >

WATCH: SeaWorld employee bottle-feeds baby manatee in heartwarming viral video

It doesn't get much cuter than this.

heartwarming video of a SeaWorld employee feeding a baby manatee with a bottle has gone viral, with more than 14,000 views on Instagram.

>> Read more trending news 

According to WSVN, photographer Michael George, author of the 2018 children's book "Life at the Zoo," shot the video at the Orlando, Florida, attraction. He shared the clip on social media Friday.

>> Click here to watch

In a November 2018 post, George said wildlife officials saved three manatee calves after Hurricane Irma slammed Florida in September 2017. 

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

"The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission brought them to the SeaWorld Rescue Team at @seaworldorlando for rehabilitation and release," George wrote at the time.

>> See the post here

Read more here.

Lone, wild pink flamingo mysteriously appears in Florida Panhandle after hurricane

A solitary, wild American flamingo has ornithologists from Michigan, Arkansas and other parts of the country coming to Florida to catch a glimpse of it. 

>> Read more trending news 

The sight of wild pink flamingos was once plentiful in Florida’s tropical climes in the 1800s. But by the end of the century, through settlement, hunting and feather and egg harvesting sightings of the birds have been scarce, according to the Audubon Society.

The bird was first spotted Oct. 31 at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, the Tallahassee Democrat reported

“It just captivates people. How often do you get to see something like that in nature?” Refuge Ranger Robin Will told the Tallahassee Democrat. “It is that people are fascinated when nature does something unexpected like that.”

This is the second time Will has seen a flamingo at the preserve in the 40 years she has worked there. The last time was in 1995. The previous recorded sighting of one at the park as in 1972. 

It is not tagged so it is not from Busch Gardens, any other zoos, or from the established flock at the Hialeah Racetrack. 

“I am going to assume he or she was swept up in a big part of (Hurricane) Michael’s turning radius and somehow maybe landed further west then made its way to the refuge,” Will told the Democrat.

The last time the birds were seen at the park were after Hurricane Allison in 1995 and Hurricane Agnes in 1972. 

The birds are known to fly considerable distances in response to changing conditions, according to the Audubon Society. 

Before Hurricane Michael struck the Panhandle, it threatened Mexico and the Caribbean, known flamingo habitats. 

Although once considered exotic to the state, researchers determined that Florida was once home to a thriving population of flamingos and appears to be repopulating.

A flock of flamingos have been seen in the Everglades coming back over the last few years, according to the Audubon Society.

“For a long time, the thought was that the majority of the free-flying birds escaped,” Audubon Florida Executive Director Julie Wraithmell told the Democrat. “Is it that it’s a bird that is unusual in north Florida or a harbinger of what could be one of Florida’s comeback stories?”

After the research was published in February, Florida wildlife officials removed the flamingo from its listing of nonnative species.

North Carolina mom charged after son dies in Hurricane Florence floods

Authorities filed criminal charges against a North Carolina woman for driving around barricades on N.C. Highway 218 last month during Hurricane Florence, an act that led to the drowning of her 1-year-old son, officials said.

>> Watch the news report here

>> On WSOCTV.com: Body of missing 1-year-old swept away by floodwaters found in Union County

Dazia Ideah Lee, 20, of Charlotte, was charged with involuntary manslaughter and a misdemeanor charge of driving on a closed/unopened highway.

They said the mother continued driving on N.C. 218 until her vehicle came across rushing water flowing across the road. Her car left the road but eventually stopped among a group of trees at Richardson Creek near New Salem. 

>> Read more trending news 

Authorities said the mother was able to free herself and Kaiden Lee-Welch from the vehicle, but she lost her grip on him in the rushing water. 

Driver fatally hits men repairing power lines, is charged with DUI manslaughter, investigators say

A driver fatally hit two men and injured another Wednesday and then fled the scene, investigators said. The men were working on power lines in the Florida Panhandle damaged by Hurricane Michael.

>> Read more trending news 

John Goedtke, 37, of Thonotosassa, was driving a truck that was pulling a U-Haul trailer when it hit the three men who were repairing power lines in Chipley, which is north of Panama City, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. 

George Cecil, 52, of Cole Rain, North Carolina, and James Ussery, 60, of Chipley, died. Ryan Barrett, 22, of Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, was taken to a hospital, where he was listed in critical condition, WFLA reported.

Goedtke was arrested and charged with DUI manslaughter, felony vehicular homicide and leaving the scene, the Highway Patrol said. 

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

120-Year-Old Shipwrecks Exposed by Hurricane Michael

120-Year-Old Shipwrecks Exposed by Hurricane Michael

Hurricane Michael exposes 120-year-old shipwrecks off Florida coast

Ships swept ashore nearly 120 years ago when a hurricane hit the Florida panhandle were recently uncovered by Hurricane Michael. 

>> Read more trending news 

The well-documented wrecks washed up on Dog Island in 1899, when the Carrabelle hurricane brought 100 mph winds, causing $1 million in damage and killing seven people, according to the Florida Department of State

“They’ve been mostly stationary since 1899 when they were wrecked in a hurricane,” Sarah Revell, spokeswoman with the Florida Department of State, wrote in an email to the Tallahassee Democrat. “From time to time, some parts of the site have become exposed.”

There are no plans for state archaeologists to visit the site, the Democrat reported.

Rescuers help hundreds of animals impacted by Hurricane Michael

Animal rescue groups are on the ground in the devastated Florida Panhandle, trying to help pet rescue organizations impacted by Hurricane Michael. 

>> Read more trending news 

The Humane Society of the United States is one of the groups taking part in the effort and has already moved more than 400 shelter animals into new homes across the country. 

Some of the pet shelters in the Panhandle were badly damaged by the powerful Category 4 hurricane, which knocked out power and water to many facilities. 

Sara Varsa with HSUS said moving animals from damaged shelters allows those shelters to better focus on animal-recovery efforts.

>> Related: Pets rescued from South Georgia Hurricane Michael damage zone need new homes

“Those facilities or those areas then have a lessened burden of unowned animals in care so that they can serve their community needs,” Varsa said.

Parts of the Florida Panhandle were decimated by Michael, which made landfall last Wednesday close to a Category 5 storm with winds of more than 150 mph.

“What I’m hearing back on the ground from our responders is this is like an F5 tornado,” Varsa said. “That’s what this devastation looks like. It’s going to be a long, long time in recovery.”

>> Related: Trumps visits storm-ravaged Georgia, Florida Panhandle after Hurricane Michael

Lawmakers are considering a House bill that would require certain licensed animal rescue groups and facilities have a disaster plan in place to keep animals safe after the next hurricane or other major storm strikes. 

 

Hurricane Michael crop damage estimates top well over $1 billion in Georgia

Cost estimates for the damage to Georgia Agriculture after Hurricane Michael are well over $1 billion, according to a new report from Georgia Agricultural Commissioner Gary Black.

>> Read more trending news 

Hurricane Michael was the first major hurricane to hit Georgia since the 1800s. It moved through southwest Georgia last week after slamming into the Florida Panhandle.

It destroyed crops, in places ripping entire pecan trees out of the ground. Some South Georgia farmers lost their entire livelihoods in just one day.

Black called the losses unprecedented and said they will impact generations to come. 

“Unfortunately, our worst thoughts were realized. We saw months and sometimes years of work just laid over on the ground in a matter of seconds,” Black said. “These are generational losses that are unprecedented and it will take unprecedented ideas and actions to help our farm families and rural communities recover.”

On Tuesday, Vice President Mike Pence toured the damage, pledging support to help communities rebuild.

“It’s not going to go unnoticed in this administration and we’re going to make sure the people of this region will have the support to rebuild," Pence said.

Here’s the new breakdown of the devastation by crop release Wednesday by the Georgia Department of Agriculture:

COTTON: $300 MILLION to $800 MILLION -- Cotton was the second highest contributor to Georgia’s farmgate value last year, contributing just over 7 percent. The final loss estimate will be dependent on farmers’ ability to harvest what remains in the field. Georgia had the potential of record yields for this year, so this loss is even more devastating.

PECAN: $560 MILLION -- Pecan trees that were blown over or broken are a severe, generational loss for farmers. It takes about seven years for a tree to begin producing nuts, and there is 100 percent crop loss in Seminole County, 85 percent in Decatur County and 30 percent in Grady County. Pecan farmers will take a decade to recover from the loss of a mature tree, and many of these farmers were still recovering from Irma when Michael rolled through.

>> Related: Trumps visits storm-ravaged Georgia, Florida Panhandle after Hurricane Michael

VEGETABLES: $480 MILLION -- Vegetables affected include sweet corn, cucumbers, squash, peppers, peas and more. Georgia is home to a wide variety of produce, much of which was affected by the high winds and hard rains of Michael. After Hurricane Florence, prices were elevated so this enhanced the loss estimate because Georgia was in a very good position to supply the market prior to Hurricane Michael. This comes as a blow to growers who had a difficult spring harvest and were counting on the fall.

POULTRY: $25 MILLION -- Poultry is Georgia’s leading agricultural industry, contributing nearly 32 percent of the state’s 2018 farmgate value in broilers and an additional 5.62 percent in eggs. Michael will make a lasting impact on this poultry industry with the loss of 97 houses and well over 2 million chickens.

PEANUTS: $10 MILLION to $20 MILLION -- While peanuts fared better than many other crops, infrastructure loss remains uncertain. The final loss estimate will be impacted by the ability to get the remaining peanuts out of the field and into storage facilities. The grading and sorting of these peanuts will play a large part of determining the final loss. Peanuts contributed nearly 5 percent of Georgia’s 2018 farmgate value. 

AGRITOURISM: Fall is typically the most important season for many agritourism sites, as it includes activities like corn mazes and pumpkin patches that bring many families and school field trips to the farms. Multiple mazes have been destroyed in addition to other farm damage. The loss estimate will be difficult to determine, even after the season is over.

>> Related: Photos: Trumps tour hurricane-ravaged Florida Panhandle

TIMBER: $1 BILLION -- Approximately 1 million acres were destroyed, most belonging to small or private landowners.

Pets rescued from South Georgia Hurricane Michael damage zone need new homes

Pets rescued from south Georgia following Hurricane Michael need new homes.

>> Read more trending news 

The Atlanta Humane Society, as it often does following disasters, has taken in dogs and cats from the Albany area. Shelter facilities there were without power or water for days after the devastating storm. Last year the organization took in more than 1,000 animals from areas impacted by hurricane damage.

The Albany arrivals will be medically evaluated and then put up for adoption at the AHS’ two shelter locations. The main branch is at 981 Howell Mill Road in Midtown and the north Fulton one is at 1565 Mansell Road. Call 404-875-5331 or see atlantahumane.org for information.

Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle a week ago as a powerful Category 4 storm. The Alaqua Animal Refuge, about 70 miles from the coast, has launched a program to extend relief to animals and their owners in the hard- hit area.

The refuge’s structures and the 350 animals it houses came through the storm fine, with only minimal property damage, so it is now offering help. 

“We’re blessed, so we’re turning our focus to help others,” president and founder Laurie Hood said. “Losing a pet during this time adds more strain to people who are already over-stressed and have little or no resources.”

Alaqua is offering to help search for lost, abandoned and injured animals in addition to offering temporary refuge for pets, displaced horses and farm animals. The facility’s veterinary staff members are on stand-by to provide medical treatment.

>> Related: Trumps visits storm-ravaged Georgia, Florida Panhandle after Hurricane Michael

“We take the animals out, provide medical treatment and keep them safe, with the goal to eventually reunite them with their owners,” Hood said. “We work with appropriate agencies, manage the process in an organized manner, and know how to handle frightened and injured animals.”

Florida Panhandle pet or farm-animal owners can reach out by calling 850-880-6694 (leave a message) or by emailing LHood@alaqua.org. For full details see alaqua.org/michael.

Trumps visit storm-ravaged Georgia, Florida Panhandle after Hurricane Michael

President Donald Trump and first lady, Melania, arrived at Robbins Air Force Base in Georgia Monday afternoon aboard Air Force One.

>> Read more trending news 

The first couple toured areas impacted by Hurricane Michael after first visiting the devastation in the Florida Panhandle.

The hurricane killed at least 18 people, knocked out power to millions, left a trail of destruction through four states and decimated Georgia’s agricultural industry.

During his first stop in Georgia at a Red Cross facility, the president said he would ask Congress for additional disaster aid funding. 

When he was asked about climate change and if he ever thought weather would occupy so much of his time during his presidency, he responded: “Weather has been a factor and yet, they say [the] worst hurricanes were 50 years ago.

“For a long period of time, we’ve had very few,” he said, according to reporters traveling with the president. “I have a home in Palm Beach Florida and frankly for years, we had none and then, the last couple of years we had more. Hopefully, we’ll go back to many years of having none. We’ve been hit by the weather, there is no doubt about it.” 

>> Related: Photos: Trumps tour hurricane-ravaged Florida Panhandle 

Gov. Nathan Deal greeted Trump at Robins. And U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, a former Georgia governor, and Brock Long, the administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, accompanied Trump. 

Trump also weighed in on several other issues during his stop in Georgia, including the disappearance of a dissident Saudi journalist in Turkey. Trump said a lot of people in his administration are working on the case involving Jamal Khashoggi, the missing columnist for The Washington Post. He added he is sending Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to meet with Saudi King Salman about it.

The president called the nation’s immigration laws the “dumbest in the history...and we are getting them changed one by one.” Further, he responded to the news that U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren had released the results of a DNA test that she said indicated she had Native American ancestry. In releasing the results, the Massachusetts Democrat was responding to taunts from Trump and others, who have mocked her as “Pocahontas” and claimed she used her heritage to gain an advantage when she was a law professor. Trump had vowed to contribute $1 million to Warren’s favorite charity if she took a DNA test and it showed she had Native American roots.

“I’ll only do it if I can test her personally, and that will not be something I will enjoy doing either,” he said in Georgia Monday.

>> Related: Hurricane Michael aftermath: Waffle House opens food truck in Panama City 

Trump left the Red Cross building to visit a local farm, where he planned to meet cotton and pecan growers who have suffered storm-related losses. 

On Sunday, Trump issued a disaster declaration for Georgia and ordered federal aid for parts of the Peach State affected by the storm. The president's decision makes federal funding available to people in Baker, Decatur, Dougherty, Early, Miller, and Seminole counties. That funding can include grants for temporary housing and home repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses and other programs.

Federal funding will also be made available to state and local government agencies and nonprofit groups on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work in the the following counties: Baker, Bleckley, Burke, Calhoun, Colquitt, Crisp, Decatur, Dodge, Dooly, Dougherty, Early, Emanuel, Grady, Houston, Jefferson, Jenkins, Johnson, Laurens, Lee, Macon, Miller, Mitchell, Pulaski, Seminole, Sumter, Terrell, Thomas, Treutlen, Turner, Wilcox, and Worth.

Georgia residents and business owners can begin applying Monday for assistance by registering at www.disasterassistance.gov or by calling 1-800-621-3362.

 More: President Trump issues disaster declaration for Georgia, orders federal aid for Peach State 

The president stopped in Georgia after surveying hurricane damage in Lynn Haven, Fla., where volunteers were registering storm victims. 

“These are some of the people who make it work, and they do it beautifully,” Trump said, according to reporters traveling with the president. 

“Somebody said it was like a very wide, extremely wide, tornado,” Trump said, standing next to Florida Gov. Rick Scott. “This was beyond any winds they’ve seen for — I guess — 50 years. Nobody has seen anything like it.” 

Scott thanked Trump for the federal response. 

“I want to thank the president for always taking my call — and for showing up. And I want to thank the First Lady,” he said. 

Georgia Power said that as of noon Monday it had restored power to 97 percent of its customers impacted by the storm. 

Candace Reese, spokeswoman for Dougherty County, said Sunday that about 14,000 people were without power in the Albany area but officials expected power to be back by midweek. Churches and Tyson Foods were offering hot meals as 10 extra chainsaw crews headed down to cut the city out from under the many trees that fell.

Phil Buckhalter, an Early County farmer near the Alabama border, said Saturday that conditions were getting worse and would continue that way, with farmers and residents alike running out of gas to power generators. With no clear answer to when power will return, Buckhalter and other farmers have been sharing the precious fuel they have on their farms with desperate residents, who don’t have the means to get their own. The farmers want to help less fortunate residents who aren’t as well off, and certainly not after an unprecedented hurricane. 

But that means the farmers can’t use the gas to power machinery for saving the few crops they have left in their battered, soggy fields. 

“It’ll run out directly,” Buckhalter said. 

Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black said his office is scrambling to get generators up and running and to reopen sites where peanuts can be graded and dried.

“One of the things we are working on right now is bringing things back on line,” he said as he awaited Trump in Macon. “There are so many places and people that are still without power. And our team has been working together on some of those priority places to get plants back open.”

>> Related: Hurricane Michael: Neighbors come together to donate supplies for hurricane victims

The hurricane has also whipped up the race for Georgia governor. Republican Brian Kemp traveled to southwest Georgia on Saturday to help local officials prepare for the start of early voting and returned to the area on Monday. His campaign organized a disaster relief drive and briefed supporters from a distribution center in Bainbridge. 

“The response on the ground, while there is much to do, has been unbelievable from the federal, state and friends and neighbors who are helping men and women indeed,” Kemp said. “It makes you proud to be in Georgia.” 

His rival, Democrat Stacey Abrams, ticked through the spate of hurricanes that ravaged her hometown of Gulfport, Miss., to a crowd in Macon as she outlined how she would handle disaster recovery if elected. 

“It’s about immediate response and also about long-term planning,” she said. “And I’m running for governor because I believe in making sure that we have a leader who sees these communities not only in the moment of devastation and the immediate aftermath, but a year out when folks have walked away and supplies have dwindled. “ 

The New York Times, the Associated Press, The Washington Post and AJC staff writers Ben Brasch, Greg Bluestein and Joshua Sharpe contributed to this report.

President Trump visits storm-damaged Florida, Georgia after Hurricane Michael

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump have landed in Florida to survey the damage Hurricane Michael left behind last week.

He was greeted by Florida Gov. Rick Scott and Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Brock Long when he arrived at Eglin Air Force Base in Okaloosa County, CNN reported.

>> Read more trending news 

The president embarked on an aerial tour of the area via Marine One. He is also scheduled to meet with officials and first responders in both Florida and Georgia today, CNN reported.

Check back for the latest on this developing story.

Proceeds from 40-pound, $2,000 pizza will go to Hurricane Florence victims

40-pound pizza you can only find in New York City goes for $2,000.

>> Watch the news report here

However, the owner of Champion Pizza said every penny he makes off the cheeseburger pie will go toward Hurricane Florence victims in North Carolina.

>> On WSOCTV.com: GOP lawmakers say they're ready to OK $800M in Florence aid

The pizza has five layers and takes a lot of preparation.

It’s so big that at least two people have to load it into the oven, and the pizza has to be split in half to fit.

The pizza is sold at seven locations across New York City.

>> Read more trending news 

"I wish or I hope like someone who likes pizza and makes $100,000 – you never know – maybe someone will buy that,” owner Hakki Akdeniz said.

Trump, first lady set to tour Hurricane Michael damage in Florida Panhandle, Georgia

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump will visit Florida and Georgia on Monday to survey damage from Hurricane Michael. 

>> Read more trending news 

The couple is slated to tour the wreckage from the storm in the Florida Panhandle, the Associated Press reported Sunday. The White House has yet to provide additional trip details. 

Vice President Mike Pence is also expected to visit south Georgia towns damaged by the storm on Tuesday, although his office has yet to confirm those plans. He scrapped a trip to Atlanta last week because of the hurricane. 

Trump spoke with Gov. Nathan Deal on Saturday to discuss recovery efforts. The president “expressed his concerns and said the federal government is fully available and committed to helping state and local agencies,” the White House said. 

>> Trending: Georgia Gov. hopeful Stacey Abrams makes history at Atlanta Pride march

“People have no idea how hard Hurricane Michael has hit the great state of Georgia,” Trump tweeted Friday. “I will be visiting both Florida and Georgia early next week. We are working very hard on every area and every state that was hit - we are with you!” 

Trump declared a state of emergency in Georgia on Wednesday, a designation that allows the state to tap into federal money, debris removal and other services to supplement local cleanup and rebuilding efforts. 

The Category 4 storm made landfall in the Florida Panhandle Wednesday afternoon and pounded portions of southern and Middle Georgia with rain and wind. It was the first major hurricane to enter Georgia since 1898, according to WSB-TV meteorologist Brad Nitz. 

>> Trending: Trump on missing Saudi journalist: Pledged to get to ‘bottom of it,’ vowed ‘severe punishment’

Michael has killed at least 18 people, including 11-year-old Sarah Radney in Seminole County, and left at least 400,000 Georgians without power. It has also devastated crops in southern Georgia, including cotton and pecans. Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black estimated the damage could take a $1 billion toll on the state’s economy. 

Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue and Black took an aerial tour of the damage earlier Sunday. 

The Associated Press and staff writer Greg Bluestein contributed to this article.

Hurricane Michael: Neighbors come together to donate supplies for hurricane victims

Neighbors in Atlanta are coming together to deliver food and water to victims of Hurricane Michael in Florida. 

>> Read more trending news 

Young and old came together in the city’s Candler Park neighborhood to help load a truck with supplies. 

A neighborhood mom posted online asking for donations and within hours, supplies like water and medical supplies poured in, not only from neighbors, but as far away as 

Birmingham, Alabama.  

Carrie Shevlin, who organized the drive, owns two vacation rentals in hurricane-ravaged Cape San Blas. 

On Friday afternoon, she put out a call for help and then went on a Costco run for supplies. 

"When I came back, I couldn't even get in my front door," Shevlin said. "The entire front porch was filled. My living room was filled."

>> Related: Hurricane Michael: Georgia's lone death is 11-year-old girl 

There were non-perishable food items, thousands of bottles of water and even cat food. 

About 30 people gathered at Shevlin’s house Saturday afternoon to donate, pack boxes and provide support. 

"The Cape is such an important place to so many people and to my family, and to see this outpouring of love for a place that's typically called the Forgotten Coast was really nice," Shevlin said. 

Carol and Eric Pittman, who Shevlin contacted through Facebook, drove a 26-foot truck from Birmingham to Atlanta.The truck will leave for Gainesville tomorrow and then be flown to people in need in Florida. 

Sheviln hopes that when the supplies arrive it will help people to prepare for the long road to recovery ahead. 

>> Related: Photos: Hurricane Michael leaves behind path of destruction

"I hope it gives them a little bit of hope and gives them the reassurance they are not alone," Shevlin said. "Hang in there, Gulf Country, we're coming. We're going to help you."

Florida man accused of defrauding FEMA of thousands of dollars after hurricanes, tropical storm

As people in Florida are struggling with the aftermath of Hurricane Michael, a Jacksonville man is wanted on allegations of defrauding FEMA of thousands of dollars.

>> Watch the news report here

Lepoleon Spikes is accused of claiming damage to different homes in Jacksonville for three separate storms.

>> Visit ActionNewsJax.com for the latest on recovery efforts in Hurricane Michael’s aftermath

A grand jury indictment claims he provided FEMA with fraudulent lease agreements as proof of damage.

>> On ActionNewsJax.com: 17 Florida DCF workers fired over emergency food stamp applications

Documents say Spikes was awarded thousands of dollars after Hurricanes Matthew and Irma, as well as Tropical Storm Debby.

“You’re taking from people and families that really need the money,” said Scherlinda Bennett, who says her home was flooded during both Matthew and Irma.

>> Read more trending news 

ActionNewsJax went to one of the homes where Spikes supposedly lived, but learned that was years ago. The home’s current owner claims it never had storm damage.

Hurricane Safety: How to make your home stronger against the next storm

When evacuation orders are given it doesn’t matter how strong your home is; you should heed the warning. 

>> Read more trending news

However, there are ways you can make sure you have a home to come back to, one design expert said. It’ll take some investment, but it’s worth it.

Mike Kleinschmidt, the principal of Design Cooperative, whose firm was behind a home on Neptune Beach, Florida, showed WJAX-TV what makes the home unique.

“In this case, it’s all concrete,” said Kleinschmidt.

From the roof to the floors and the walls, Kleinschmidt said it was like creating a bunker.

“You could certainly build this house out of wood, but you’re not going to get the same sort of sense of security,” said Kleinschmidt.

Building an all-concrete home doesn’t come cheap, here is what you can do now to make sure your existing home can survive a storm.

“Go in and look at the weak points of your house and try to fortify those points,” said Kleinschmidt.

He said weak points are generally any openings, like doors and windows.

“You could put in missile-impact windows, you can put in stronger doors,” said Kleinschmidt. 

If your house was built before the current building codes, you should take it a step further.

“You want to make sure your trusses are tied down securely to the wall,” said Kleinschmidt.

Missile-impact windows can also run you in the thousands of dollars, but Kleinschimidt said that if that’s not in your budget, it’s worth updating older windows with newer ones that meet current code requirements.

Hurricane Michael: Looter shot trying to steal fire marshal’s car

A looter was fatally shot Friday trying to steal a Florida state fire marshal’s vehicle, officials said. 

>> Read more trending news 

The man yelled at a witness that he was looting, got into the vehicle which had its flashing lights running and shut the door, WPMI reported

“As I’m crossing the doorway, I look back, saw the officer at the passenger side. I don’t believe the door was open yet. Then I got about three more feet inside, and I heard the shot,” witness Landon Swett told WPMI

The Florida Highway Patrol confirmed a state fire marshal was involved in the shooting, WPMI reported.

With many businesses with broken windows and doors, looting has been an issue in some areas, WPMI reported.

Hurricane Michael: Georgia's lone death is 11-year-old girl

The family of an 11-year-old Georgia girl killed in Hurricane Michael is trying to do right by her, but is facing tough odds.

>> Read more trending news 

Sarah Radney died, according to authorities, after debris from a carport crashed into the home where she was staying in Seminole County. As of Thursday night, she was the state’s lone reported death attributed to Michael.

“It’s rough, I’ve never lost a kid,” said her father, Roy Radney. “One minute I’m OK, and the next minute I’m falling apart. And I’ve got five (other) kids to coach through this. I don’t know what I’m doing.”

Sarah Radney’s loved ones have started an online fundraising effort to help pay for her funeral. Kim Hendrix, the child’s aunt, who moved from South Georgia to Mississippi a couple of years ago, started the GoFundMe account.

The accident, which happened in the midst of the storm, left Sarah injured and out of reach of rescuers for several hours. Her father, who was in Thomasville with his other children, ached to rush to her side, but others stopped him for his own safety.

“It’s just so hard being a father two counties away while your child is dying,” Radney said Thursday night to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

He doesn’t blame rescuers for not going out into the teeth of the storm. “When people get these damn warnings, they need to listen. If you stay, that’s what they really mean: No one is coming.”

Hendrix said Sarah loved her family, was in advanced classes at a school in Cairo, and enjoyed being in a band. Sarah played the trumpet, her dad said. And she would call Hendrix every Sunday to make sure that her aunt picked her up for church, Radney said.

Sarah and her 12-year-old brother were staying with their grandparents near Lake Seminole for fall break when Michael hit the area hard.

“We knew Michael was coming, but we had no idea it was going to be like this,” Radney said.

Radney said he called Sarah and her brother every 30 minutes or so during the storm. But then the cell signal got spotty.

He told Sarah to go to her grandma’s closet and put a mattress over them if she was scared.

“That’s the last advice I’d given her,” Radney said.

He pointed out that his son, who is his only male child, witnessed everything. 

“He went through a lot worse than I did,” Radney said. “He’s definitely a new hero of mine.”

Radney, a welder, said any assistance would mean a great deal to the family because he expects to be out of work for awhile.

Hendrix said that Radney, her brother, “does a great job” giving his children what they need. 

By Friday evening, the online fundraising effort had brought in more than $19,000 from more than 415 people.

“Unfortunately, the family is going through a tough time and while money cannot heal or make the situation a happy one, the funds will assist the family in working through some tough battles in the coming days and months,” the GoFundMe narrative reads.

Because of widespread power outages across Georgia Sarah’s body was taken to Dothan, Alabama, Hendrix said.

She said Radney will travel to Dothan to take care of arrangements to get the body back — a tough task, considering fuel shortages and travel difficulties in South Georgia in the wake of the storm.

Photos: Before and after Hurricane Michael

Hurricane Michael: Georgia father struggles after 11-year-old daughter dies

The family of an 11-year-old Georgia girl killed in Hurricane Michael is trying to do right by her, but is facing tough odds.

>> Read more trending news 

Sarah Radney died according to authorities, after debris from a carport crashed into the home where she was staying in Seminole County. As of Thursday night, she is the state’s lone reported death believed to be caused by Michael.

“It’s rough, I’ve never lost a kid,” said her father Roy Radney on Thursday night. “One minute I’m o.k. and the next minute, I’m falling apart. And I’ve got five (other) kids to coach through this. I don’t know what I’m doing.”

The loved ones of Sarah Radney have started an online fundraising effort to help pay for her funeral. Her aunt Kim Hendrix, who moved from South Georgia to Mississippi a couple years ago, started the GoFundMe account.

Hendrix said the girl had five other siblings.

>> Related: Hurricane Michael live updates: ‘Looks like an atomic bomb had hit,’ survivors sift through rubble

The accident, which happened in the midst of the storm, left Sarah injured and out of reach of rescuers for several hours. Her father, who was in Thomasville with his other children, ached to rush to her side, but others stopped him for his own safety.

“It’s just so hard being a father two counties away while your child is dying,” Radney said.

He doesn’t blame rescuers for not going out into the teeth of the storm. “When people get these damn warnings, they need to listen. If you stay, that’s what they really mean: No one is coming.”

Hendrix said Sarah loved her family and playing band. Hendrix said her niece was in advanced classes at a school in Cairo.

>> Related: Photos: Hurricane Michael leaves behind path of destruction

Hendrix said that Sarah and her 12-year-old brother were staying with their grandparents near Lake Seminole when Michael hit the area hard. Their father was with the other four children in Thomasville.

Roy Radney, a welder, said any assistance would mean a great deal to the family because he expects to be out of work for a while. “He does a great job giving them what (they need),” Hendrix said of her brother.

By Thursday night, the online fundraising effort had brought in more than $1,200 from about 30 people in less than a day.

“Unfortunately, the family is going through a tough time and while money cannot heal or make the situation a happy one, the funds will assist the family in working through some tough battles in the coming days and months,” the GoFundMe narrative reads.

>> Related: Hurricane Michael: How to help

Due to the power outages, Sarah’s body was taken to Dothan, Ala., Hendrix said. She said her brother will travel to Dothan to take care of arrangements to get her body back, a tough task considering fuel shortages and travel difficulties in South Georgia in the wake of the storm.

Results 1 - 20 of 48 next >

THE DOVE POLL

10NEWS 7 DAY FORECAST

7 Day Forecast

DOVE INSTAGRAM


@1055WDUV ON TWITTER


 

Amazon Alexa

Enable our Skill today to listen live at home on your Alexa Devices!