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Tom Brady calls Trump's comments on national anthem protests 'divisive'

President Donald Trump has not been shy about pushing back on NFL players protesting the national anthem. As a result, the sports world has been set on fire with various players, coaches, front offices and even full leagues responding in kind. On Monday morning, New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady followed suit.

>> Live updates: Trump slams NFL players for national anthem protests, athletes react

In response to Trump, with whom Brady is famously friendly, the legendary signal-caller took a stance in an interview with WEEI (via ESPN.com):

>> PHOTOS: NFL takes a stand on football Sunday

“I certainly disagree with what he said. I thought it was just divisive.

“I just want to support my teammates. I’m never one that says, ‘Oh, that’s wrong or that’s right.’ But I do believe in what I believe in, and I believe in bringing people together and respect and love and trust. Those are the values that my parents instilled in me and that’s how I try to live every day.

“I’ve been blessed to be in a locker room with guys from all over the United States over the course of my career. Some of my great friends are from Florida, Virginia, New York, Montana, Colorado, Texas. I think one thing about football is that it brings so many guys together, guys that you would never have the opportunity to be around, whether it was in college and all the way into the pros. We’re all different. We’re all unique. That’s what makes us all so special.”

>> Read more trending news

Brady did not blast Trump in the same way that many have, but he was plain in his comments about disagreeing and referring to Trump’s sentiments as “divisive.”

Read more here.

Ivanka Trump used personal email for government business, watchdog group says

A watchdog group said Monday that emails released to the organization show that President Donald Trump’s daughter and senior White House adviser Ivanka Trump used a personal email address to conduct White House business as recently as March, although a White House spokesperson said that the first daughter did not have a government email account when the correspondence was sent.

>> Read more trending news

The discovery by watchdog group American Oversight came one day after Ivanka Trump’s husband, Jared Kushner, said through a statement by his attorney that he used a private email address to conduct government business.

>> Related: Jared Kushner used personal email to conduct White House business, lawyer says

The emails from Ivanka Trump to Linda McMahon, administrator of the United States Small Business Administration, were sent in February, according to copies of the correspondence released by American Oversight. At the time, Ivanka Trump was not a federal employee but was “operating inside the White House in a nonofficial capacity,” Newsweek reported.

In a statement obtained by Newsweek, a White House spokesperson said that Ivanka Trump became a federal employee in March.

“She made clear that one of her reasons for doing so was to ensure that she would have access to government-issued communications devices and receive an official email account to protect government records,” the spokesperson said, adding that at the time of the communications, Ivanka Trump did not have an official email account.

Austin Evers, executive director of American Oversight, however, said that the situation shows “yet again … that there’s one rule for the Trump family and another for everyone else.”

“It’s simply breathtaking that both Ivanka and Jared Kushner would conduct government (business) on a personal email account after running a campaign centered on that very issue,” Evers said. “The fact that they would brazenly ignore rules governing email use raises even more questions about their judgment and fitness to hold positions in the White House.”

The Hill reported that the emails from Ivanka Trump showed that she copied her chief of staff, Julie Radford, on the emails, and that Radford had a White House email address.

Donald Trump criticized former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton sharply last year for her use of private email, leading supporters on chants of “Lock her up” and insisting that her actions were illegal as the two vied for a seat in the Oval Office. The FBI determined last year that Clinton did not break the law, although then-FBI Director James Comey said that she and her colleagues were "extremely careless in their handling of very sensitive, highly classified information.”

Steelers fans burn memorabilia over national anthem stance

The Pittsburgh Steelers didn’t take to the field Sunday as the national anthem played before the team faced the Chicago Bears, and that decision isn’t sitting well with some fans.

>> Read more trending news

Steelers fans across America posted videos on social media showing them burning their memorabilia after the team failed to show up for the anthem. The protest comes amid tension between NFL players, who first started taking a knee during the anthem last year in protest of inequality and police violence, and President Donald Trump, who called the protests disrespectful.

>> Related: Trump slams NFL players for national anthem protests, athletes react

Jim Heaney, a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, posted on YouTube and said, “Can't come out and stand for our anthem or flag? I'm done with you. #BoycottPittsburghSteelers #BoycottTheNFL.”

Jared Kushner used personal email to conduct White House business, lawyer says

Jared Kushner, President Donald Trump’s son-in-law and a senior White House adviser, used a personal email account to discuss official government business, despite his father-in-law’s criticism of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for doing the same, according to multiple reports.

>> Read more trending news

The email account was set up in December, Politico reported, noting that Kushner also uses an official White House email account. The news site was the first to report on Kushner’s use of private email.

“Fewer than 100 emails from January through August were either sent to or returned by Mr. Kushner to colleagues in the White House from his personal email account,” Kushner’s lawyer, Abbe Lowell, said Sunday in a statement to Politico. “These usually forwarded news articles or political commentary and most often occurred when someone initiated the exchange by sending an email to his personal rather than his White House address.”

Trump, who faced Clinton last year in the race for the White House, criticized the former secretary of state numerous times for her use of private email, leading supporters on chants of “Lock her up” and insisting that her actions were illegal. The FBI determined last year that Clinton did not break the law, although then-FBI Director James Comey said that Clinton and her colleagues were "extremely careless in their handling of very sensitive, highly classified information.”

Politico reported that there were no indications that Kushner used his private email account to discuss sensitive or classified information.

An unidentified government official told The New York Times that “unlike in the Clinton case, Mr. Kushner had not set up a private server to house the personal email account. While Mrs. Clinton used her personal account exclusively, the official said that Mr. Kushner does use his government account.”

At a news briefing on Monday, White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said that, to her knowledge, Kushner’s use of private email was “very limited.”

“White House counsel has instructed all White House staff to use their government email for government matters,” she said, adding that staff was “instructed on this one pretty regularly.”

Government officials are required to keep records of their correspondence under federal law. Lowell told the Times that all White House-related emails were forwarded to Kusner’s official government address in order to create a record of the correspondence.

Trump's latest statement 'a declaration of war,' North Korean foreign minister says

North Korea's foreign minister on Monday told reporters that President Donald Trump has issued "a declaration of war" against the Hermit Kingdom in the president’s most recent statements on the country.

>> Read more trending news

However, White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders insisted at a news briefing on Monday that no declaration had been made.

“We’ve not declared war on North Korea, and frankly the suggestion of that is absurd,” she said.

On Saturday, Trump said that North Korea "won't be around much longer" if it continues to threaten the United States.

 

NFL stadium worker quits job after national anthem protest

After working for nearly three decades at New York’s New Era Field, a man quit his job Sunday after Buffalo Bills team members knelt in protest during the national anthem.

>> Read more trending news

“I waited until the national anthem ended,” stadium worker Erich Nikischer told WGRZ. “I took off my shirt, threw my Bills hat on the ground (and) walked out.”

Nikischer told the news station that he felt Bills players were being disrespectful with their failure to stand during the anthem, echoing statements made by President Donald Trump over the weekend in which he criticized players who have used the pre-game anthem for protest.

“That’s a total disrespect for our heritage,” Trump told a crowd gathered in Alabama on Friday. “That's a total disrespect for everything we stand for.”

Trump’s comments drew both criticism and applause.

>> Related: Trump slams players, NFL responds by taking a knee

Bills owners Terry and Kim Pegula said in a statement Saturday that the team had a meeting in the wake of Trump’s comments, which they called “divisive and disrespectful.”

“We tried to use them as an opportunity to further unify our team and our organization,” the statement said. “Our players have the freedom to express themselves in a respectful and thoughtful manner, and we all agreed that our sole messages is to provide and to promote an environment that is focused on love and equality.”

Nikischer told WGRZ that he will miss his co-workers, but added that he will not return to the stadium until after the national anthem protests end.

“I believe people have the right to protest,” Nikischer said. “I just don’t believe that’s the proper venue for it.”

Who is Anthony Weiner?

Updated Sept. 25, 2017: Anthony Weiner was sentenced Monday, to 21 months in prison for “sexting” a 15-year-old girl. 

The Chicago Tribune reported that Weiner dropped his head into his hand as he stood in court when the sentence was announced. 

Prosecutors had been seeking a 21 to 27-month sentence. 

Previous post: 

FBI sources said Friday that new emails, which “appear be pertinent” to the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server, were discovered during an investigation into allegations of sexting with a minor made against former Congressman Anthony Weiner.

The FBI is investigating Weiner, who is the estranged husband of Clinton’s longtime aide Huma Abedin, on charges he sent illicit texts to a 15-year-old girl in North Carolina.

It’s not the first time Weiner has been the center of a “sexting” scandal.

FBI director James B. Comey informed members of Congress on Friday via a letter that emails had surfaced in a case that “appear to be pertinent to the investigation” of Clinton's use of a private email server.

According to the New York Times, the e-mails were contained on four electronic devices seized from Weiner and Abedin, and it was those emails that led the FBI to re-open its investigation into Hillary Clinton.

So who is Anthony Weiner and what are his connections to Bill and Hillary Clinton? Here’s what we know about him.

  • Weiner was born and raised in New York City. He served the New York's 9th congressional district from January 1999 until June 2011, when he resigned after a sexting scandal was made public.
  • Weiner is married, but separated from, Hillary Clinton’s top aide, Abedin. The couple were married in July 2010 by former President Bill Clinton. Their reception was held at the Clinton’s home.
  • The couple has a 4-year-old son.
  • Weiner resigned as a New York congressman in 2011 after he sent photos of himself, clad only in underwear, to 40,000 Twitter followers, when he was trying to send the photo to a woman. That was the first of his sexting scandals.

Here is a look at all of his known sexting incidents.

May 31, 2011

Weiner accidentally posted a photo of himself clad only in his underwear to 40,000 Twitter followers instead of the 21-year-old woman he intended the photo to go to. The woman, Gennette Cordova, said she had never met Weiner. Weiner said his Twitter account was hacked and that he did not send the photo.

June 6, 2011

Days later, Weiner recanted his hacking story and admitted he sent the photo. He said he had sexted with six women over a three-year period. “I have done things I deeply regret. I apologize to my wife and our families. I’m deeply ashamed,” Weiner said.

June 11, 2011

Five days later, amid calls for him to resign, Weiner took a leave of absence from Congress to “seek professional treatment.”

June 16, 2011

Weiner announced his resignation from Congress.

July 23, 2013

Weiner again admits that he has been sexting was a woman as he is in the middle of a campaign for mayor of New York.

July 26, 2013

Some reports say Weiner’s wife, Abedin, is considering leaving him. Weiner loses the election.

May 20, 2016

The documentary “Weiner” is released. It shows the couple in some of their worst moments during the mayoral campaign, including when one of the women he sexted shows up at a campaign event.

Aug. 28, 2016

A photo of Weiner on a bed with his sleeping son by his side is published on the front of the New York Post. Weiner again is clad only in underwear. The story says he was sexting with a 15-year-old North Carolina girl at the time. According to the story, Weiner had referred to his son as a “chick magnet.”

Abedin announces the next day that she and Weiner are separating.

In the week after the latest revelation, a child-welfare agency announced its investigating Weiner after it was revealed that he sexted explicit photos of himself that also showed his 4-year-old asleep next to him.

George Clooney criticizes Hillary Clinton over failed presidential campaign

In a recent interview, George Clooney opened up about Hillary Clinton and made a few surprising remarks about the former secretary of state.

>> On Rare.us: George Clooney compares flood-drenched Houston to war-torn Syria

Clooney was a staunch Clinton supporter during the 2016 election and even donated money to her campaign, along with a slew of other Democratic operations, and held a fundraiser for her. But during the interview with The Daily Beast, the star was a bit critical of the former secretary of state. He echoed a common criticism of Clinton’s race for the Oval Office, saying that he “never really saw her elevate her game.” Clooney also said that while Clinton was qualified for the job, “being qualified for the job does not necessarily mean you’re the right person to be president.”

>> Trump administration announces new travel ban: 'The tougher, the better'

He added: "She was more qualified than even her husband was when he was elected president, but she’s not as good at communicating things. That’s simply true. When she got up and gave a speech, it didn’t soar."

>> Read the full interview here (WARNING: Profanity)

While he did take time to toss a few barbs at Clinton, Clooney was also intensely critical of President Donald Trump. Clooney remarked that growing up poor in Kentucky, he knew what it was like to struggle.

"People in Hollywood, for the most part, are people from the Midwest who moved to Hollywood to have a career," Clooney said. "So this idea of 'coastal elites' living in a bubble is ridiculous. Who lives in a bigger bubble? He lives in a gold tower and has 12 people in his company."

The 56-year-old actor and director also criticized Trump’s response to the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

>> Read more trending news

"Well, think about it this way: If I was president of the United States and David Duke is praising me and the white nationalists were talking about how I was on their side, the first thing I would do is I would come out and say, '[Expletive] these guys. Anyone who believes this is not in my camp, I don’t believe it, and I completely reject it,'" Clooney said.

At one point in the interview, the star laid into Trump’s former adviser Steve Bannon, saying, "Steve Bannon is a little wannabe writer who would do anything in the world to have had a script made in Hollywood.”

– The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

Stevie Wonder takes 'both knees' after Trump slams NFL stars' national anthem protests

After a weekend marked by President Donald Trump’s public spats with Steph Curry, Colin Kaepernick and professional athletes who protest during the national anthem, singer Stevie Wonder knelt in support of several causes before his set at the Global Citizens Festival on Saturday in New York City.

>> Live updates: Trump slams players, NFL responds by taking a knee

>> See the clip here

>> WWII veteran, 97, kneels in support of NFL's national anthem protests

With the help of an assistant, Wonder got down on both knees and told the audience, “Tonight, I’m taking a knee for America. Not just one knee, but both knees. Both knees in prayer for our planet, our future and our leaders of the world. Amen. I wanted to say that prayer before I served you my musical meal.”

>> Read more trending news

According to CNN, Wonder also pleaded with his audience to confront hate, racism and sexism during the set, telling the crowd, “I didn’t come here to preach, but I’m telling you, our spirit must be in the right place … You need to interrupt hate, stand down bigotry, condemn sexism and find love for all of our global brothers and sisters every day.”

Trump administration announces new travel ban: 'The tougher, the better'

The Trump administration late Sunday announced it is replacing its travel ban with a new proclamation barring visitors from eight countries, saying those nations are not doing enough to block terrorists from reaching the United States. 

>> On AJC.com: Dishwasher to Doctor: Syrian refugee achieves American dream. Now he helps others do the same.

The new directive continues existing restrictions against Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen. And it adds new ones for Chad, North Korea and Venezuela starting Oct. 18 and remaining in place indefinitely until the countries toughen their security procedures. Venezuela’s restrictions narrowly apply to that nation’s government officials – and their immediate relatives – who are responsible for traveler screening procedures.

>> On AJC.com: From March: Trump travel ban again targets refugees 

“The travel ban: The tougher, the better,” President Donald Trump told reporters in Washington on Sunday. 

The first version of Trump’s travel ban — announced in January — sowed widespread confusion, triggered angry demonstrations in Atlanta and across the nation and ultimately stalled amid constitutional challenges. Trump replaced it in March with an order barring visitors from six Muslim-majority countries: Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. 

>> On MyAJC.com: From June: U.S. Supreme Court reinstates key parts of Trump’s travel ban

It also halted this nation’s refugee resettlement program. Senior administration officials said Sunday they would announce plans for next fiscal year’s refugee resettlements in the coming days.

Like his original travel ban, Trump’s March 6 order drew court challenges. Trump has cast his travel restrictions as efforts to block terrorist attacks, while his critics say they are driven by discrimination. The U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments about it on Oct. 10. 

>> On MyAJC.com: From June: Travel ban begins as guidelines draw fire

Walt Wallace — a traveler from Richmond, Virginia, who was traveling through Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport on Sunday — said he understood the security issues involved in the travel ban. But he also said he was concerned about the impact on "people who are legitimately trying to come here... escaping persecution."

>> Read more trending news

Edward Ahmed Mitchell, executive director of Georgia chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, said Friday his organization might send attorneys to the airport. Mitchell added his organization will be watching to see if the restrictions are "motivated by legitimate concerns about national security, or are they motivated by anti-Muslim bigotry." 

"If the order only impacts people who do not already have visas to travel here, then nobody should be caught up at the airport," Mitchell said. But "if the order affects those already in transit like the first order did, then chaos could erupt and we'd need our attorneys at the airport."

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