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9 healthy-sounding foods that have more sugar than a Krispy Kreme doughnut

American Heart Association experts recommend men shouldn’t eat more than 36 grams of added sugar a day and women should limit their sugar consumption to 25 grams.

>> Read more trending stories  

So a single Krispy Kreme doughnut, which has 10 grams of sugar, takes up a good bulk of your recommended daily intake.

>> Shaquille O'Neal buys Krispy Kreme store

But healthy-sounding snack replacements like yogurt and raisins actually rack up more sugar than you might think. And several options even have more than double the sugar of a Krispy Kreme original glazed doughnut.

>> Related: National Doughnut Day 2017 deals and freebies 

Here are 11 foods and drinks with more sugar than a Krispy Kreme doughnut:

To learn more about added sugars and your recommended intake, visit heart.org.

Is it better to wash your hands in cold or hot water? 

Do you always wash your hands in hot water? A new study suggests you can turn the heat down a notch because cleaning your hands in cold water is just as good. 

>> Read more trending news

Professors from Rutgers University-New Brunswick conducted an experiment to learn the most effective way to clean your hands. While many people assume warmer temperatures get rid of more germs, the researchers’ results proved that it’s a myth. 

Analysts gathered 20 volunteers, asking them to wash their hands, which were covered in bugs, 20 times each in 59-, 79- and 100-degree Fahrenheit water with varying amounts of soap.

»Related: How well are you cleaning the 10 filthiest places in your kitchen? 

They determined that there was no difference in the number of insects removed in each of the water temperatures or amounts of soap. 

»Related: Photos: The 10 germiest items in your home 

"People need to feel comfortable when they are washing their hands but as far as effectiveness [goes], this study shows us that the temperature of the water used did not matter," researcher Donald Schaffner said.

Although the scientists noted their study was small and more research was needed, they recommend people wash their hands for at least 20 seconds, using an adequate amount of soap to cover the entire surface. 

U.S. Alzheimer’s disease deaths up 55 percent, CDC says

An estimated 5.4 million Americans are affected by Alzheimer’s disease, making it the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S.

» RELATED: Alzheimer’s disease fueled by gut bacteria, new study finds 

According to a recent report from the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the death rate from the disease has risen by 55 percent in recent decades.

Experts collected data from death certificates and found that 93,541 Americans who died in 2014 had Alzheimer’s disease cited as the cause of death. That’s a rate of 25.4 deaths per 100,000 people.

>> Read more trending news

It’s a 54.5 percent increase since 1999, when the rate of Alzheimer’s disease deaths was 16.5 deaths per 100,000 people, according to the CDC.

» RELATED: How does Alzheimer's disease kill you? 

By 2050, experts estimate the number will jump to 13.8 million afflicted U.S. adults ages 65 and up.

The increase is due to multiple factors, including the growing population of older adults and increased reporting and diagnosis by physicians and medical examiners among others, according to the report.

While most U.S. Alzheimer’s disease deaths occurred in a nursing home or a long-term care facility, that number has dramatically declined since 1999, from 14.7 percent to 6.6 percent in 2014.

» RELATED: Living with Alzheimer’s disease and the fight to combat it 

Instead, more and more patients died at home instead of in medical facilities.About a quarter of Alzheimer’s patients in 2014 spent their last days at home compared to just 13.9 percent in 1999.

“Millions of Americans and their family members are profoundly affected by Alzheimer's disease,” CDC acting director Anne Schuchat said in a statement. “As the number of older Americans with Alzheimer's disease rises, more family members are taking on the emotionally and physically challenging role of caregiver than ever before.”

» RELATED: How to help Alzheimer’s patients enjoy life, not just ‘fade away’ 

In addition, patients, caregivers and publicly funded long-term care facilities bear significant financial and societal costs due to increasing rates of Alzheimer’s deaths.

Experts recommend more federal funding toward caregiver support and education and toward research to find a cure.

According to the CDC report, the U.S. is estimated to spend a total $259 billion in 2017 on care costs for those with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

» RELATED: Don’t go it alone when caring for a spouse with dementia 

And those caring for Alzheimer’s or dementia patients provided 18.2 billion hours of unpaid assistance in 2015.

“This is a tidal wave of Alzheimer's disease that is now upon us. We've been saying Baby Boomers are getting older and we have to be ready. Now it's here. It's here, and it's not going away unless we do something serious about it. Ultimately, we want to eradicate this disease. That is possible,” Keith Fargo, director of scientific programs at the Alzheimer’s Association, told CBS News.

Click here to read the full CDC Morbidity and Mortality report.

Tobacco use kills 7 million a year, poisons environment, WHO says

The World Health Organization is highlighting the dangers of tobacco use as one of the biggest public health threats in the world.

More than 7 million people die every year due to tobacco use, costing households and governments more than $1.4 trillion in health care costs and productivity loss, experts wrote in a news release Tuesday, the day before World No Tobacco Day.

In addition, tobacco waste contains more than 7,000 toxic chemicals that poison the environment and contributes to 16 percent of all noncommunicable disease deaths, the WHO said.

>> Read more trending news

The drug is a threat to livelihoods, too, according to the WHO. Around 860 million adult smokers live in either low- or middle-income countries, often spending more than 10 percent of their income on tobacco products and leaving less for things such as food, health care and education.

According to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S. with more than 480,000 reported deaths (nearly one in five deaths) each year and 16 million Americans suffering with at least one disease caused by smoking.

This costs the country nearly $170 billion in direct medical costs.

Nationwide, according to 2015 data, 31.4 percent of U.S. high school youth reported using a tobacco product, and 10.8 percent reported smoking cigarettes.

The CDC offers tips for smokers who want to quit, including a hotline for referrals to local resources (1-800-784-8669), best practices guidelines and more at CDC.gov.

More about the threat of tobacco use at WHO.int.

Neighbors help 5-year-old with rare disease celebrate Halloween in May

Family and friends are helping a sick boy celebrate a special Halloween-themed birthday in May.

>> Watch the news report here

Carter Sarkar of Castaic, California, outside Los Angeles, has Sanfilippo syndrome, a disorder that prevents the body from properly processing sugar. The disease will slowly cause Carter to lose his motor skills and brain function until his body eventually shuts down, likely during his teenage years, KTLA reports.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

On Sunday, Carter’s neighbors helped him celebrate his 5th birthday by allowing him to go door-to-door and trick-or-treat with his friends.

>> Read more trending news

“That’s why we go all-out for everything we do because you don’t know if he’s going to be here next year or if he’s going to be able to say ‘Mom’ or ‘Dad’ next year or his sisters, so you just have to live for today and hope for tomorrow with him,” said mom Jennifer Sarkar.

The family started a crowdfunding account to raise money in hopes of finding a cure for Sanfilippo syndrome. If you would like to donate, click here.

Doctor: Popular charcoal masks could cause permanent skin damage

A popular “do-it-yourself” charcoal mask that has been trending all over the internet could cause serious damage to your skin, according to a dermatologist.

"It might be dangerous if you like all three layers of your skin," Dr. Seth Forman, a dermatologist in Tampa, Florida, said in an interview with WFTS

Many people have taken to YouTube to show users the painful process of peeling off the charcoal mask. Many of these products are sold from “unregulated vendors,” WFTS reports. Forman said that some of these products are mixed with a foreign charcoal powder and super glue, and will “most likely” be illegal soon. 

If certain layers of skin are peeled off, it can lead to scarring and infection “especially when you get down to the second layer (of skin),” according to WFTS

The good news is that there is a large variety of FDA approved facial masks that are safe, Forman said.

WATCH: Young girl left temporarily paralyzed illustrates dangers of tick bites

A 3-year-old girl in Oregon awoke on May 13 to find herself unable to stand or use her arms.

>> Read more trending news 

Evelyn Lewis’ mother, Amanda Lewis, filmed her daughter’s failed attempts to stand with help from her husband. 

WGHP reported that the parents took Evelyn to the emergency room, where a doctor discovered a small but dangerous reason for her condition.

After combing through Evelyn’s hair, the doctor discovered a tick, diagnosing her with a condition called “tick paralysis.”

“The doctor talked to us for a minute and said over the past 15 years he had seen about seven or eight children her age with identical symptoms and more than likely she had a tick,” Amanda Lewis wrote on Facebook. “It can affect dogs also and can be fatal. I’m glad we took her in when we did and that it wasn’t something worse and that we found it before it got worse.”

According to the American Lyme Disease Foundation, tick paralysis attacks a person’s muscles and results in symptoms like muscle pains and numbness of the legs. These begin after a tick has attached itself to a host, generally on the scalp.

>> Related: Rare tick-borne illness worries some medical professionals

Fortunately, Evelyn is now doing much better, as her mother wrote on Facebook that she “is now pretty much completely back to her feisty little self. She complains a lot about her head itching but otherwise, she’s just fine.”

Here’s how much fruit juice children should drink, according to new guidelines

Next time you're grocery shopping for your kids, think twice before adding a carton of fruit juice to your basket. The American Academy of Pediatrics has updated its guidelines on all juices, advising parents to pull back on how much they serve their little ones.

» Related: What Atlanta dietitians feed their kids 

Previous recommendations said parents should wait to give their babies juice until after six months, but its latest update is suggesting that they wait one year. 

In fact, infants should only be fed breast milk or infant formula for the first six months. After six months, moms and dads can then introduce fruit to their diet, but not fruit juice. 

>> Read more trending news

“Parents may perceive fruit juice as healthy, but it is not a good substitute for fresh fruit and just packs in more sugar and calories,” said Melvin B. Heyman, MD, FAAP, co-author of the statement. “Small amounts in moderation are fine for older kids, but are absolutely unnecessary for children under 1.”

» Related: Should we slap a tax on sugary drinks? 

Scientists laid out instructions for older children, too. Toddlers who are ages 1 to 4 should only have one cup of fruit a day. Four ounces of that can come from 100 percent fruit juice, but it should be pasteurized and not labeled “drink,” “beverage” or cocktail.” 

For children ages 4 to 6, fruit juice intake shouldn't exceed four to six ounces a day. 

The amount increases just slightly for children ages 7 to 18. They can have up to two and a half cups of fruit servings, but only eight ounces of it should be juice. 

Miss USA says affordable health care is a 'privilege,' not a right

The reign of the newly crowned Miss USA is off to a rocky start.

Even before Kara McCullough, Miss District of Columbia, was announced the winner, social media was in a frenzy over her responses during the Q&A segment of the broadcast.

McCullough, a 25-year-old physical scientist at the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, was asked whether affordable health care for all U.S. citizens is a right or a privilege.

>> Photos: Miss District of Columbia Kara McCullough wins Miss USA 2017

“I’m definitely going to say it’s a privilege,” she said. “As a government employee, I am granted health care, and I see firsthand that for one to have health care, you have to have jobs.”

McCullough also set fingers a-tweeting when she said she did not consider herself a feminist.

McCullough, a woman of color, said she was worried about how audiences would view her natural hair in a sea of straight and teased pageant locks.

>> Read more trending news

“When I chose to wear my hair curly, I was afraid. I didn’t know how people were going to accept it, if anyone was going to be receptive to it at all, but I felt like a Grecian goddess on stage!” she told Refinery 29.

But it was her viewpoints that ended up as the topic of debate rather than her hairstyle:

McCullough is a 2013 graduate of South Carolina State University, a historically black college in Orangeburg, South Carolina.

She follows the reign of Deshauna Barber, the former Miss USA who also hailed from D.C.

The organization, once owned by President Donald Trump, was sold in 2015 to talent agency and entertainment company WME/IMG.

Police officer donating kidney to sick boy she just met

A police officer is taking her oath to a whole new level, protecting and serving one of the young members of the community by donating her kidney.

>> Watch the news report here

Officer Lindsey Bittorf of the Milton, Wisconsin, Police Department saw a plea on Facebook in December by Kristi Goll, who was desperate to find a kidney donor for her 8-year-old son, Jackson.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news

Jackson was born with posterior urethral valves, family members told WISN.

Bittorf was tested and learned that she is a match for Jackson. Doctors were shocked to find such a strong match in someone who wasn’t a blood relative.

>> Read more trending news

Bittorf surprised the family with the good news at their home. The touching moment was captured on video.

“I took an oath to serve and protect our community,” Bittorf told Jackson, “and now my kidney’s going to serve and protect you.”

Read more here.

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