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Stove Top selling comical, super stretchy ‘Thanksgiving Dinner Pants’

Thanksgiving lovers, you’re in for a treat.

Stove Top, a popular stuffing brand by Kraft, is selling “Thanksgiving Dinner Pants” to make Thanksgiving dinner a more comfortable experience. 

>> Read more trending news

The super-stretchy pants let you eat as much as you like without the constraint of jeans, khakis or dress pants. They come in a maroon color with stuffing patterns on the pockets and waistband, and range from size small to extra large. 

Stove Top’s comical commercial suggests the pants are made from a fabric “astronauts use” and “can expand two times the original size.”

>> Related: Stuffing vs dressing: Is there really a difference?

Stove Top will be selling the festive pants until Nov. 30 for only $19.98. You can buy them on the website thanksgivingdinnerpants.com

Ten thousand dollars from the proceeds will be donated to Feeding America

Are leggings distracting? Atlanta fifth-graders want dress code changes

Two leggings-clad fifth-grade girls asked the Atlanta school board Monday to change its student dress code, which bans clothing that is “extremely tight” and “distracting.”

>> Read more trending news 

The board is reviewing revisions that would emphasize the dress code must be fairly enforced. Some Atlanta Public Schools students have complained the current rules target girls and want the new policy to drop the word “distracting.” 

“This is a label applied to girls’ clothing. I do not believe that clothing is a distraction. It is just the reaction that matters,” said Falyn Handley, a 10-year-old student at Springdale Park Elementary School, who spoke along with fellow leggings wearer and classmate Ruby Segerman. “I should not be punished for other people’s behavior. I am not a distraction.” 

The dress code rewrite is scheduled to go before the board’s policy review committee later this month and then return to the full board Dec. 4. The board likely will consider final approval in January, said board member Eshé Collins, who leads the policy committee. 

Read more about the proposed dress code changes here.

15,000 scientists warn it will soon be 'too late' to save Earth

More than 15,000 scientists have signed a dire warning letter to humanity, urging society to address major environmental concerns.

» RELATED: What’s in the federal climate report? 7 key takeaways

"Soon it will be too late to shift course away from our failing trajectory, and time is running out," scientists wrote in the letter signed by 15,364 of their colleagues from 184 countries. "We must recognize, in our day-to-day lives and in our governing institutions, that Earth with all its life is our only home."

Titled as a "Second Notice," the stern warning comes 25 years after similar concerns were expressed in a letter backed by more than 1,700 scientists. However, as the updated warning points out, things have significantly worsened since then.

» RELATED: The best US cities to avoid effects of climate change, according to report

"Humanity has failed to make sufficient progress in generally solving these foreseen environmental challenges, and alarmingly, most of them are getting far worse," the letter says.

>> Read more trending news

Freshwater resources and vertebrate species have dropped by approximately 25 percent since 1960. At the same time, marine dead zones have increased dramatically by 75 percent and carbon dioxide emissions have risen by 62 percent. The human population has also skyrocketed from 3 billion to roughly 7.6 billion.

» RELATED: What is the Paris climate agreement? 9 things you should know

Furthermore, human activity has "unleashed a mass extinction event, the sixth in roughly 540 million years, wherein many current life forms could be annihilated or at least committed to extinction by the end of this century," the scientists warn.

The only hopeful part of the letter points to the stabilization of the stratospheric ozone layer. According to Newsweek, scientists revealed this month that the hole in the ozone layer, which hovers above Antarctica, is the smallest it has been since 1988.

» RELATED: GAO: Climate change already costing US billions in losses

But this one positive development isn't enough to curb the impending crisis, according to the scientists.

"Humanity is now being given a second notice ... We are jeopardizing our future by not reining in our intense but geographically and demographically uneven material consumption and by not perceiving continued rapid population growth as a primary driver behind many ecological and even societal threats," they wrote.

» RELATED: Doctors: Global warming is taking a toll on people's health

The scientists said humanity must quickly "limit population growth, reassess the role of an economy rooted in growth, reduce greenhouse gases, incentivize renewable energy, protect habitat, restore ecosystems, curb pollution, halt defaunation, and constrain invasive alien species ... Humanity is not taking the urgent steps needed to safeguard our imperiled biosphere.”

Drastic solutions are required to solve the coming global crisis, according to the scientists. These include phasing out fossil fuels while encouraging renewable energy sources, transitioning to a more plant-based diet, reducing food waste overall and prioritizing reserves for Earth's land, marine, freshwater and aerial habitats.

» RELATED: Atlanta makes ambitious commitment to 100 percent clean energy by 2035

"To prevent widespread misery and catastrophic biodiversity loss, humanity must practice a more environmentally sustainable alternative to business as usual," the scientists wrote.

While nations around the world have officially recognized the need to address these concerns and the threat to humanity's existence, the current U.S. administration appears uninterested in heeding such warnings.

President Donald Trump said in June that he would pull the U.S. out of the landmark 2015 Paris climate agreement, joining only two other nations -- Syria and Nicaragua -- which had not signed the international accord.

Since then, Nicaragua agreed to sign the agreement in October, and Syria followed earlier this month.

» RELATED: US cities, states defy Trump, still back Paris climate deal

Instead of addressing greenhouse gas emissions as the Paris accord requires, the White House said it "will promote coal, natural gas and nuclear energy as an answer to climate change,” a decision scientists around the globe have warned against.

Thanksgiving 2017: The best and worst times to drive and fly this Thanksgiving

Don’t let road rage or flight delays ruin your Thanksgiving.

» RELATED: Thanksgiving 2017 travel trends and tips

To ensure you make smart travel plans this November holiday, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reached out to popular navigation app Waze for national historical traffic data to determine the best and worst days to be on the move around Thanksgiving Day (Thursday, Nov. 23).

The AJC also incorporated Google Flights historical data, which was shared on the company blog in October. 

PRE-THANKSGIVING DAY

Best and worst times to drive

If you’re driving, the best time to hit the road is 6 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 19, according to Google.

» RELATED: Police surprise drivers with Thanksgiving turkeys instead of traffic tickets

Between Sunday and up until 3 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 22, traffic will get progressively worse.

But Waze data shows 5 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 21, is the worst time to drive for Thanksgiving, especially if you’re headed to the airport.

Using 2016 data, Waze found Tuesday navigations to airports are up by 50 percent and Wednesday navigations to airports are up by 66 percent.

» RELATED: Holiday travel with kids: Top survival tips

Best and worst times to fly

Google data indicates Friday, Nov. 17 and Wednesday, Nov. 22 will be the busiest pre-Thanksgiving airport days. Try to avoid flying on these days.

POST-THANKSGIVING DAY

Best and worst times to drive

Waze data shows the worst time to drive home after Thanksgiving will be Monday, Nov. 27 at 7 a.m. and 5 p.m.

But there will also be a spike of mid-day travel on Sunday, Nov. 26. Traffic will peak at 2 p.m. Sunday.

» RELATED: It’s not all about the turkey: 9 things you probably didn't know about Thanksgiving

And if you’re headed to the airport Sunday, Waze warns that navigations to airports will peak at 4 p.m. and 5 p.m Sunday., so you may want to consider booking an earlier flight.

Compared to an average November Sunday, navigations to airports on Nov. 26 will be up by 53 percent.

» RELATED: All the Black Friday sales you should be jumping on now

If you’re flying back home Monday, navigations to airports will be up by 21 percent compared to an average November Monday, according to historical Waze data.

Best and worst times to fly

Google Flights search data from the past two years indicates that Sunday, Nov. 26 is one of the busiest days of the year to fly.

Google recommends booking a flight back home on Monday, Nov. 27, instead of Sunday.

Here’s more on the worst times to drive nationally around Thanksgiving:

» RELATED: Thanksgiving 2017: Alternative ways to spend the holiday

Survey: Nearly 7 in 10 Americans say they’d give up gift-giving this holiday season

Would you give up the holiday gift-giving tradition this year if your friends and family agreed to it?

According to a new Harris Poll survey on behalf of SunTrust, 69 percent of Americans said they would.

>> Read more trending news 

The poll, conducted online within the U.S. between Oct. 3-5, includes responses from 2,185 American adults ages 18 and older, 1,986 of whom said they spend money on something related to the holidays.

» RELATED: Too much Christmas music is bad for your health, psychologists say

Forty-three percent of respondents said they feel pressured to buy gifts and spend more money than they can afford.

With the extra time and money saved by eliminating gift-giving, 60 percent of Americans said they’d spend more time with loved ones, 47 percent would save money or invest it, 37 percent would pay down debt and 25 percent said they would use the money on activities with friends and family.

» RELATED: 7 tips on doing Christmas dinner on a budget

In an effort to help reduce financial gift-giving stress this holiday season, SunTrust introduced the onUp Challenge, “a free, gamified experience that turns finances into an adventure,” the company said in a news release.

“The holidays are full of joy, celebration and an unmentioned pressure to spend,” Brian Nelson Ford, financial well-being executive at SunTrust, said. “During a time of year when financial stress is traditionally high, a little smart spending, preparation and planning can lead to financial confidence and enhance the joy of the season.”

» RELATED: Are the holidays the most miserable time of year?

Potential survey limitations

According to SunTrust, because the online survey isn’t based on a probability sample, an estimate of theoretical sampling error cannot be calculated.

NASA postpones JPSS-1 weather satellite launch

NASA, in partnership with the NOAA, scrubbed Tuesday’s launch of a weather satellite that will help improve weather forecasts due to a last-minute technical problem.

JPSS-1 is the first of a few polar orbiting satellites to launch from the Joint Polar Satellite System.

>> Read more trending news 

The satellites will help improve NOAA forecasts for the three- to seven-day time frame. The data collected from the JPSS is fed into the numerical forecast models to help improve them. The satellites will also collect atmospheric measurements, ground conditions and ocean conditions like vegetation, hurricane intensity, and atmospheric moisture.

The JPSS-1 was scheduled to be launched around 4:47 a.m. EST from Vandenburg Air Force Base in California. The launch has been postponed until Wednesday.

This satellite is a polar orbiting satellite, which means it will orbit the earth from the one pole to the other passing the equator 14 times a day. Full coverage of the planet will be provided then twice a day.

'Cheetah' spotted roaming streets in Pennsylvania turns out to be big African cat

Residents thought they saw a cheetah running free in the streets of Reading, Pennsylvania. But when authorities responded to the scene recently, they found a rare African serval cat instead.

>> Watch the news report here

The spotted feline was out for a walk when staffers from the Animal Rescue League of Berks County arrived.

The 1- or 2-year-old cat was docile, declawed and friendly, leading the rescuers to think she was a pet.

>> Read more trending news

It is illegal to own these types of cats in Pennsylvania without a license.

A big-cat group is now in possession of the animal.

Parents of twins find out they're expecting triplets

A father was shocked when he found out his wife was expecting triplets after welcoming a set of twins.

>> Watch the news report here

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

In addition to the three bundles of joy on the way, Nia and Robert Tolbert of Waldorf, Maryland, have three sons, ABC News reports. The couple welcomed one son, Shai, six years ago. Twin boys Riley and Alexander came next. The twins are now 2 years old.

Nia surprised Robert with the news by placing the sonogram photos in a bag with three onesies.

>> On HotTopics.TV: Watching these twin babies dance will melt your heart

“I opened the bag and I saw a very, very long sonogram,” Robert told ABC News. “Then I saw three onesies in the bag … and they were numbered 1, 2, and 3.”

The couple told WUSA the babies were conceived naturally. Nia learned she hyperovulates, which means her body releases more than one egg during ovulation.

After getting over the initial shock, they said they are excited to welcome the newest members of their family.

>> Read more trending news 

“We live by the mantra of being impeccable with our words. Words have power. The more positivity you speak into your life, the more positivity you’ll get out of it. So we don’t have time to be negative or woe is me or be nervous,” Robert said.

The couple told Inside Edition they’re officially done having kids. They found out in an exciting gender reveal that they are expecting three baby girls, bringing perfect balance to their home — three boys and three girls.

Police surprise drivers with Thanksgiving turkeys instead of traffic tickets

Police officers in Billings, Montana, are getting into the holiday spirit by handing out free turkeys instead of tickets.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

According to the Billings Gazette, local businessman Steve Gountanis donated 20 turkeys to the Billings Police Department and asked for their help to distribute them to the community ahead of Thanksgiving.

>> On HotTopics.TV: Woman wins $3,000 shopping spree, donates everything to kids in need

Traffic officers spent an afternoon last week pulling people over for minor traffic offenses like broken tail lights. After making sure there were no outstanding warrants for the driver, the police officers let them off with a warning and a free turkey.

“The individuals that received the warnings and the turkeys have been very happy,” Lt. Neil Lawrence told ABC News. “Our Facebook page has received a lot of positive comments regarding it. So far, it's been a very positive thing for the community.”

>> Read more trending news 

Officers told the Billings Gazette that one driver joked he needed another traffic violation so he could get another turkey for Christmas.

Women less likely than men to get CPR from bystanders -- and more likely to die -- study suggests

New research funded by the American Heart Association and the National Institutes of Health shows gender may play a major role in whether or not someone receives life-saving CPR from bystanders.

And it may come down to a person’s reluctance to touch a woman’s chest in public, The Associated Press reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Researchers presented the findings Sunday at an American Heart Association Conference in Anaheim, California.

It’s the first study to examine gender differences in receiving heart help from the public versus professional responders.

The study, which involved nearly 20,000 cases around the country, found only 39 percent of women suffering cardiac arrest in public received CPR, compared to 45 percent of men.

Men were also 23 percent more likely to survive a cardiac arrest occurring in public.

» RELATED: Do heart stents even work? New study finds they fail to ease chest pain

Researchers don’t know why exactly rescuers were less likely to assist women and did not find a gender difference in CPR rates for people suffering from cardiac arrest at home, where a rescuer is more likely someone who knows the person needing help.

» RELATED: Study: Patients who undergo heart surgery during this time of day have better chance for survival

“It can be kind of daunting thinking about pushing hard and fast on the center of a woman’s chest,” and some people may fear they are hurting her, said lead researcher Audrey Blewer, from the University of Pennsylvania.

And, according to Dr. Benjamin Abella, another study leader, rescuers may also worry about moving a woman’s clothing to get better access or touching breasts to do CPR.

But proper CPR shouldn’t entail that, Abella said.

“You put your hands on the sternum, which is the middle of the chest. In theory, you’re touching in between the breasts,” he said. “This is not a time to be squeamish, because it’s a life and death situation.”

The Mayo Clinic’s Dr. Roger White, who co-directs the paramedic program for the city of Rochester, Minnesota, said he has long worried that large breasts may impede proper placement of defibrilator pads if women need a shock to restore normal heart rhythm.

“All of us are going to have to take a closer look at this” gender issue, he said.

» RELATED: Common painkillers increase risk of heart attack by one-third, new study finds

More than 350,000 Americans who may or may not have diagnosed heart disease suffer a cardiac arrest each year in areas other than a hospital, and about 90 percent of them die. According to the American Heart Association, CPR can double or triple survival odds.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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